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Employment Law Attorneys Roy UT

While there are no published studies focusing on Singles profiling in job interviews, marital status is certainly a subject an employer should not ask about. There are several categories which employers must avoid because basing an employment decision on any one of them is discriminatory: Race, Color, Sex, Religion, National Origin, Birthplace, Age, Disability and, Marital/family status.

David B. Park
(801) 299-6700
39 East Eagleridge Dr # 102
North Salt Lake, UT
Specialties
Employment, Contracts, Construction
Education
Brigham Young U,Brigham Young University-Idaho,University of Utah
State Licensing
Wisconsin

James Glenn Swensen Jr
(801) 364-7500
Po Box 1991
Salt Lake City, UT
Specialties
Business, Employment
Education
Brigham Young Univ J Reuben Clark LS UT,Brigham Young Univ
State Licensing
California

Tyson B. Snow
(801) 363-5678
170 South Main Street, Suite 900
Salt Lake City, UT
Specialties
Employment, Intellectual Property, Commercial
Education
Brigham Young University - J. Reuben Clark Law School,Brigham Young University
State Licensing
Utah

Lincoln W. Hobbs
(801) 519-2333
466 East 500 South #300, 466 East 500 South #300
Salt Lake City, UT
Specialties
Litigation, Real Estate, Employment, Construction
Education
University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law
University of Utah
State Licensing
Idaho, Utah, Wyoming

Matthew Jonas Harmer
(801) 438-1541
3165 Millrock Dr Ste 340
Holladay, UT
Specialties
Employment
Education
Brigham Young Univ J Reuben Clark LS UT,Brigham Young Univ
State Licensing
California

Alison Blaise Looney
(801) 539-7247
2351 N 1100 W
Salt Lake City, UT
Specialties
Employment
Education
U of San Francisco SOL,California Polytechnic St U
State Licensing
California

Scott Duane Preston
(801) 426-8200
3301 North University Ave
Provo, UT
Specialties
Real Estate, Intellectual Property, Bankruptcy, Contracts, Employment
State Licensing
Oregon, Utah

Mary J. Woodhead
(801) 532-6367
380 West 200 South, Suite 101
Salt Lake City, UT
Specialties
Employment, Litigation, Intellectual Property
State Licensing
Utah

Kirsten Michelle Schneider
3463 Canyon Cove Dr
Salt Lake City, UT
Specialties
Employment, General Practice, Landlord & Tenant, Litigation
State Licensing
Washington

Bryan Kirk Benard
(801) 595-7833
60 E South Temple #2000
Salt Lake City, UT
Specialties
Employment
Education
Univ of Utah COL,Weber St Coll
State Licensing
California

Single Profiling, Is There Such a Thing?

Q: I saw a news story about Mommy profiling at job interviews. I've felt that there has been Singles profiling in some of my job interviews. Is that legal?

 

While there are no published studies focusing on Singles profiling in job interviews, marital status is certainly a subject an employer should not ask about. There are several categories which employers must avoid because basing an employment decision on any one of them is discriminatory: Race, Color, Sex, Religion, National Origin, Birthplace, Age, Disability and, Marital/family status. Clearly the primary issue in this last category is most often focused on protecting women with children or planning to have children and persons with family obligations that an employer might perceive would get in the way of work hours. While an employer may ask about your availability, they are not entitled to ask about your family circumstances.

Though marital status discrimination is not covered by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, many government employees may be protected by other provisions including the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 (CSRA), and a number of states and cities have statutes or ordinances specifically prohibiting marital status discrimination. While an employer may discuss availability or general plans for the future to gauge a person's commitment level, one cannot ask about pregnancy plans, lack thereof or marital status even if the inquiries as to marital status are to establish perceived home stability. And if you have a loved one at home for whom you are the sole caretaker, that is also off limits as far as inquiries.

Singles in the workplace often find that they are "volunteered" or requested to work overtime or additional hours, as opposed to others in the office, that may or may not be compensated. This too is an inappropriate request/demand by an employer, and if you feel uncomfortable with this circumstance you are encouraged to speak to a Human Resources manager about your concerns. As marital status discrimination in the workplace can be a gray area, it is also suggested that you document any perceived indiscretion so that should you need to seek legal counsel you will be armed with proper documentation of your claims.

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DISCLAIMER: This publication is distributed with the understanding that it does not constitute legal advice or establish an attorney/client relationship by way of any information contained herein. The information provided is for general purposes only, as readers are advised to consult with a qualified lawyer regarding the specifics of their particular circumstances.


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