Employment Law Attorneys Leitchfield KY

While there are no published studies focusing on Singles profiling in job interviews, marital status is certainly a subject an employer should not ask about. There are several categories which employers must avoid because basing an employment decision on any one of them is discriminatory: Race, Color, Sex, Religion, National Origin, Birthplace, Age, Disability and, Marital/family status.

Jeffrey Alan Savarise
(502) 561-3965
Suite 2000, 220 W. Main St
Louisville, KY
Specialties
Employment, Business, Appeals
Education
University of Akron
State Licensing
Ohio, Texas

Frank McGinnis Jenkins III
(859) 389-9344
Frank Jenkins Law Office, 631 East Main Street
Lexington, KY
Specialties
Social Security, Workers Compensation, Car Accident, Personal Injury
Education
University of Kentucky Law School
Centre College
State Licensing
Kentucky

Kasey Bond
(513) 651-6186
7310 Turfway Road, Suite 210
Florence, KY
Specialties
Employment
Education
Vanderbilt University
State Licensing
Texas

Ariana Rachelle Levinson
2119 Lowell Ave
Louisville, KY
Specialties
Employment
Education
Univ of Michigan Law Sch,University of Michigan
State Licensing
California

Christopher P. Evensen
(502) 719-3145
6011 Brownsboro Park Blvd., Suite A
Louisville, KY
Specialties
Workers Compensation, Personal Injury
Education
University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law
State Licensing
Kentucky

Bradley H. Pruitt
(502) 468-4527
2700 National City Tower, 101 South Fifth Street
Louisville, KY
Specialties
Contracts, Corporate, Employment, Health Care
Education
University of Alabama
State Licensing
Georgia, Kentucky

Justin Lee Lawrence
(859) 525-1160
6900 HOUSTON RD STE 19
FLORENCE, KY
Specialties
Personal Injury, Workers Compensation, Chapter 7, Chapter 13, Maritime
Education
University of Kentucky
University of Kentucky
Salmon P. Chase College of Law
State Licensing
Kentucky

Kenneth James Henry
(502) 499-4959
2303 Hurstbourne Village Drive, Suite 1200
Louisville, KY
Specialties
Family, Education, Insurance, Employment, Chapter 7, Civil Rights, Chapter 13
State Licensing
Kentucky

Samuel Duncan Hinkle IV
(502) 333-6000
2000 Pnc Plaza, 500 W Jefferson St
Louisville, KY
Specialties
Employment, Litigation
Education
Yale Law School,Washington & Lee
State Licensing
California

Maria N Sorolis
(502) 589-4200
3500 National City Tower, 101 South Fifth Street
Louisville, KY
Specialties
Employment
Education
University of Georgia School of Law,Duke University
State Licensing
DC, Florida

Single Profiling, Is There Such a Thing?

Q: I saw a news story about Mommy profiling at job interviews. I've felt that there has been Singles profiling in some of my job interviews. Is that legal?

 

While there are no published studies focusing on Singles profiling in job interviews, marital status is certainly a subject an employer should not ask about. There are several categories which employers must avoid because basing an employment decision on any one of them is discriminatory: Race, Color, Sex, Religion, National Origin, Birthplace, Age, Disability and, Marital/family status. Clearly the primary issue in this last category is most often focused on protecting women with children or planning to have children and persons with family obligations that an employer might perceive would get in the way of work hours. While an employer may ask about your availability, they are not entitled to ask about your family circumstances.

Though marital status discrimination is not covered by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, many government employees may be protected by other provisions including the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 (CSRA), and a number of states and cities have statutes or ordinances specifically prohibiting marital status discrimination. While an employer may discuss availability or general plans for the future to gauge a person's commitment level, one cannot ask about pregnancy plans, lack thereof or marital status even if the inquiries as to marital status are to establish perceived home stability. And if you have a loved one at home for whom you are the sole caretaker, that is also off limits as far as inquiries.

Singles in the workplace often find that they are "volunteered" or requested to work overtime or additional hours, as opposed to others in the office, that may or may not be compensated. This too is an inappropriate request/demand by an employer, and if you feel uncomfortable with this circumstance you are encouraged to speak to a Human Resources manager about your concerns. As marital status discrimination in the workplace can be a gray area, it is also suggested that you document any perceived indiscretion so that should you need to seek legal counsel you will be armed with proper documentation of your claims.

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DISCLAIMER: This publication is distributed with the understanding that it does not constitute legal advice or establish an attorney/client relationship by way of any information contained herein. The information provided is for general purposes only, as readers are advised to consult with a qualified lawyer regarding the specifics of their particular circumstances.


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