Prostate Cancer Screening Telford PA

It initially appeared that a prior family history of prostate cancer was the dominant factor in motivating men to be screened. Men with a family history of prostate cancer were found to be 40% more likely to get screened than those without such history. However, upon closer scrutiny, researchers discovered that family history is only a primary motivator for men who are currently married or co-habitating.

Martin Craig Hightower, MD
(215) 453-4950
700 Lawn Ave
Sellersville, PA
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In New Orleans, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1987
Hospital
Hospital: Grand View Hospital, Sellersville, Pa
Group Practice: Pennview Radiation Oncology

Data Provided by:
Martin Hightower
(215) 453-4950
700 Lawn Ave
Sellersville, PA
Specialty
Radiation Oncology

Data Provided by:
Lorraine C Snyder Dougherty
(215) 257-6858
920 Lawn Ave
Sellersville, PA
Specialty
Hematology / Oncology

Data Provided by:
Alan C Kaufman
(215) 257-6858
920 Lawn Ave
Sellersville, PA
Specialty
Hematology / Oncology, Medical Oncology

Data Provided by:
Mark Edward Alden, MD
(215) 257-6858
920 Lawn Ave
Sellersville, PA
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Jefferson Med Coll-Thos Jefferson Univ, Philadelphia Pa 19107
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided by:
Sandra H Harris-Corrado, MD
(215) 257-5877
920 Lawn Ave Ste 4
Sellersville, PA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Hematology-Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Meharry Med Coll Sch Of Med, Nashville T
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided by:
Thomas S Siesholtz, MD
(215) 257-8858
920 Lawn Ave
Sellersville, PA
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Temple Univ Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19140
Graduation Year: 1978
Hospital
Hospital: St Lukes Quakertown Hospital, Quakertown, Pa; Grand View Hospital, Sellersville, Pa
Group Practice: Buxmont Oncology

Data Provided by:
Alan Carl Kaufman, MD
(215) 257-6858
920 Lawn Ave
Sellersville, PA
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Syracuse, Coll Of Med, Syracuse Ny 13210
Graduation Year: 1968
Hospital
Hospital: St Lukes Quakertown Hospital, Quakertown, Pa; Grand View Hospital, Sellersville, Pa; Central Montgomery Med Ctr, Lansdale, Pa
Group Practice: Buxmont Oncology

Data Provided by:
Howard S Zipin, MD
(215) 257-6858
920 Lawn Ave
Sellersville, PA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Temple Univ Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19140
Graduation Year: 1994
Hospital
Hospital: Grand View Hospital, Sellersville, Pa; Chestnut Hill Rehab Hosp, Wyndmoor, Pa
Group Practice: Buxmont Oncology

Data Provided by:
Jay Franklin Ziegenfuss
(215) 257-6858
920 Lawn Ave
Sellersville, PA
Specialty
Hematology / Oncology

Data Provided by:
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Single Men and Risk of Prostate Cancer

Is it possible that being a single male could prove to be hazardous to your health? Research suggests that this may indeed be the case if you are a single male at risk of prostate cancer. A long term men’s health study was recently conducted on over 2,400 U.S. men. Results of the study were used to gain insight into the factors that motivate men to proactively seek prostate screenings. It initially appeared that a prior family history of prostate cancer was the dominant factor in motivating men to be screened. Men with a family history of prostate cancer were found to be 40% more likely to get screened than those without such history. However, upon closer scrutiny, researchers discovered that family history is only a primary motivator for men who are currently married or co-habitating.

What’s Love Got to Do With It?

Researchers must do subsequent research to determine what additional factors have a direct bearing on motivating men to get prostate screenings. However, the initial evidence clearly shows that involvement in a committed relationship, be it marriage or co-habitation, has a positive impact in this regard. Conventional wisdom is that the concerned significant other exerts influence to persuade or encourage the at risk male to receive regular prostate screenings. An analysis of higher risk men, who live alone, showed that they are less likely to be screened than those at lower risk who live with a wife or partner. Recognizing the significance of this finding has caused researchers to consider directly targeting spouses and partners, in addition to the at risk men themselves, in hopes of increasing the percentage of men regularly getting screened.

Other Risk Factors

While interesting to consider, singleness, is far from being the most important risk factor for assessing the likelihood of contracting prostate cancer. Studies show that African American men are 61% more likely than their Caucasian counterparts to develop prostate cancer. Men with a first degree relative (i.e. father, brother, son) with the disease are twice as likely to contract it. In addition to race and genetics, social and environmental factors such as diet and nutrition can play a contributing role as well.

Early Detection is Key

Prostate cancer affects roughly 1 in 6 men. Instances of contracting this cancer are nominal in men under 40. However, the rate increases exponentially for men who fall in the 40-59 age bracket. Prostate cancer, like any cancer, is most curable when detected in the early stages. The recommendation of the American Cancer Society is that men with a family history of prostate cancer be initially screened for the disease once they turn 45, and annually thereafter.

 

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