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Employment Law Firms Humble TX

I think my boss is reading my personal e-mails at work. The issue is that I have been going back and forth with this guy I am dating and things have gotten pretty hot, electronically. Is my employer legally allowed to look through these letters? While one might argue that an employee can reasonably expect some level of privacy in their personal e-mails generated on the work computer, employees have virtually no such rights, even if you are accessing your e-mail on your own accounts but using the employers' computer server.

Adam Patrick Wooster
(713) 828-9502
18802 Polo Meadow
Humble, TX
Specialties
Business, Employment
Education
Texas Tech University
State Licensing
Texas

Cari Lowe Curtis
(281) 312-3577
19001 Crescent Springs Dr
Kingwood, TX
Specialties
Employment
Education
University of Houston
State Licensing
Texas

Brooks Talton Harrison
(281) 616-5099
P.O. Box 6423
Houston, TX
Specialties
Employment, Administrative Law, Personal Injury, Litigation
Education
South Texas College of Law
State Licensing
Texas

Kenneth J. Burch
(281) 618-3110
15350 Vickery Drive
Houston, TX
Specialties
Business, Insurance, Employment, International Law, Personal Injury, Real Estate, Litigation
Education
St. Mary's University
State Licensing
Texas

Andrew Michael Tolchin
(713) 465-8733
21899 Valley Ranch Crossing Drive, Suite 1322
Porter, TX
Specialties
Lawsuits & Disputes, Appeals, Intellectual Property, Bankruptcy, Business, Insurance, Fraud, Criminal Defense, Juvenile, Employment, Elder Law, Probate, Ethics, Family, Immigration, Intellectual Property, Personal Injury, Real Estate, Litigation
Education
South Texas College of Law
State Licensing
Texas

Andrea Curtis Mchenry
(281) 348-3102
19001 Crescent Springs Dr
Kingwood, TX
Specialties
Employment, Administrative Law
Education
Tulane University
State Licensing
Maryland, Texas

Michael L. Brown
(281) 348-3257
19001 Crescent Springs Dr Mailbox 1-2500, Mailbox 1-2500
Kingwood, TX
Specialties
Employment
Education
University of Houston
State Licensing
Texas

Scott C. Petersen
(281) 361-9705
4910 Garden Ford Dr
Kingwood, TX
Specialties
Employment
Education
Mcgeorge School of Law
State Licensing
Texas

William Robert Williams
5711 Gladehill Dr.
Kingwood, TX
Specialties
Business, Employment
Education
University of Akron
State Licensing
Pennsylvania, Texas

Amanda Grace Green Snowden
(281) 577-2629
29177 E. Wallis Drive
Porter, TX
Specialties
Tax, Business, Insurance, Employment, Administrative Law, Immigration, Litigation
Education
University of Houston
State Licensing
Texas

Email Issues in the Office

Q: I think my boss is reading my personal e-mails at work. The issue is that I have been going back and forth with this guy I am dating and things have gotten pretty hot, electronically. Is my employer legally allowed to look through these letters?

 

While one might argue that an employee can reasonably expect some level of privacy in their personal e-mails generated on the work computer, employees have virtually no such rights, even if you are accessing your e-mail on your own accounts but using the employers' computer server. If you want to send personal e-mails, jokes and links to content, your employer generally has the right to access any of those materials unless their e-mail/internet usage policy has specifically set forth a reasonable expectation of privacy in those communications, or the employer acts in a manner indicating to the employees that they would enjoy such privacy. To be safe, you must assume that any e-mail you send is or can be reviewed by your employer.

Most employers usually do not review employee's e-mails unless there is some indication of abuse such as complaints about improper communications and/or a tracking system that indicates excessive internet usage. But the law is certainly more favorable to the employer than the employee in this arena. The best way to ascertain your right to e-mail privacy is by closely reading your employer's personnel manual regarding e-mail usage and policies, which courts require need be clearly and well communicated. Of course, disputes over whether such policies are clearly communicated generally arise after the "milk has been spilled," and it is not worth risking your privacy and possibly your employment because of improper use of your e-mail system.

A good rule of thumb is to save the personal communication for your own personal communication devices and accounts, as employers rightfully can expect that their employees are working on employer related matters while using employer owned equipment.

DISCLAIMER: This publication is distributed with the understanding that it does not constitute legal advice or establish an attorney/client relationship by way of any information contained herein. The information provided is for general purposes only, as readers are advised to consult with a qualified lawyer regarding the specifics of their particular circumstances.


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