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Employment Law Firms Conway SC

I think my boss is reading my personal e-mails at work. The issue is that I have been going back and forth with this guy I am dating and things have gotten pretty hot, electronically. Is my employer legally allowed to look through these letters? While one might argue that an employee can reasonably expect some level of privacy in their personal e-mails generated on the work computer, employees have virtually no such rights, even if you are accessing your e-mail on your own accounts but using the employers' computer server.

Dirk Julius Derrick
(843) 248-7486
802 Main Street
Conway, SC
Specialties
Social Security, Workers Compensation, Car Accident, Personal Injury
State Licensing
South Carolina

Williams, Christopher - Mc Nair Law Firm
(843) 444-1107
2411 Oak St Ste 206
Myrtle Beach, SC

Data Provided by:
Christian E. Boesl
(803) 256-2660
P.O. Box 12487
Columbia, SC
Specialties
Workers Compensation, Employment, Defective & Dangerous Products, Litigation
Education
University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law,Brigham Young University
State Licensing
South Carolina

Charles Edward Rawlings
(803) 779-2300
700 Gervais St Ste 300
Columbia, SC
Specialties
Employment, Litigation
Education
University of South Carolina School of Law,University of South Carolina
State Licensing
South Carolina

Aisha G. Taylor
(803) 256-2660
1330 Lady Street, 6th Fl, PO Box 12487
Columbia, SC
Specialties
Workers Compensation, Employment
Education
University of South Carolina School of Law,University of South Carolina
State Licensing
South Carolina

David Swanner
(843) 448-0499
409 21st Ave. North
Myrtle Beach, SC
Specialties
Personal Injury, Employment & Labor Relations
Secondary Specialties
Optometry Malpractice, Asbestos Mesothelioma, Amputation, Slip & Fall, Truck Accidents, Elder and Nursing Home Abuse, Invasion of Privacy, Nursing Home Negligence, Toxic Mold, Medication Malpractice, Tobacco, Wrongful Death, Manufacturing Defects, Radiation & Electromagnetic Energy, Burn Injury, Emergency Room Errors, Felony Auto Accident, Cosmetic Surgery, Jones Act, Motorcycle Accidents, Pesticides, Wrong Diagnosis or Misdiagnosis, Psychiatric Malpractice, Design Defects, HMO Managed Case
State Licensing
South Carolina

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Lewis Gregory Cook Horton
(843) 722-3400
5 Exchange Street
Charleston, SC
Specialties
Business, Construction, Employment, Intellectual Property, Defective & Dangerous Products
Education
University of South Carolina School of Law,Clemson University
State Licensing
South Carolina

Karen M. Tyner
(864) 699-1134
PO Box 5398
Spartanburg, SC
Specialties
Government Contracts, Employment, Class Action
State Licensing
North Carolina

Matthew James Gilley
(864) 699-1143
Po Box 5398
Spartanburg, SC
Specialties
Employment, International Law, Discrimination
Education
Emory University
State Licensing
Georgia, North Carolina

Brian P Murphy
(864) 370-9400
514 Pettigru St.
Greenville, SC
Specialties
Employment
Education
University of South Carolina School of Law,Pennsylvania State University
State Licensing
Pennsylvania, South Carolina

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Email Issues in the Office

Q: I think my boss is reading my personal e-mails at work. The issue is that I have been going back and forth with this guy I am dating and things have gotten pretty hot, electronically. Is my employer legally allowed to look through these letters?

 

While one might argue that an employee can reasonably expect some level of privacy in their personal e-mails generated on the work computer, employees have virtually no such rights, even if you are accessing your e-mail on your own accounts but using the employers' computer server. If you want to send personal e-mails, jokes and links to content, your employer generally has the right to access any of those materials unless their e-mail/internet usage policy has specifically set forth a reasonable expectation of privacy in those communications, or the employer acts in a manner indicating to the employees that they would enjoy such privacy. To be safe, you must assume that any e-mail you send is or can be reviewed by your employer.

Most employers usually do not review employee's e-mails unless there is some indication of abuse such as complaints about improper communications and/or a tracking system that indicates excessive internet usage. But the law is certainly more favorable to the employer than the employee in this arena. The best way to ascertain your right to e-mail privacy is by closely reading your employer's personnel manual regarding e-mail usage and policies, which courts require need be clearly and well communicated. Of course, disputes over whether such policies are clearly communicated generally arise after the "milk has been spilled," and it is not worth risking your privacy and possibly your employment because of improper use of your e-mail system.

A good rule of thumb is to save the personal communication for your own personal communication devices and accounts, as employers rightfully can expect that their employees are working on employer related matters while using employer owned equipment.

DISCLAIMER: This publication is distributed with the understanding that it does not constitute legal advice or establish an attorney/client relationship by way of any information contained herein. The information provided is for general purposes only, as readers are advised to consult with a qualified lawyer regarding the specifics of their particular circumstances.


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