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Stress Management & Counseling Sparks NV

Get a handle on finances. Raising a family on one income, or relying on an ex-spouse for child support, can be one of the hardest aspects of parenting alone. That's why it's important to take steps to budget your money, learn about long-term investments, plan for college and retirement, and, if possible, enhance your earning power by going back to school or getting additional job training.

Mr. Edward Silverhardt
Center for Applied Behavioral Sciences
(775) 250-4359
2470 Wrondel Way, Suite 111
Reno, NV
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW, LSCSW, BCD
Licensed in Nevada
33 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Other (gambling, sex, etc.), Addictions/Substance, Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Career/Employment Concerns, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Domestic Violence, Family Dysfunction, Forensic, Grief/L
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Military/Veterans, Offenders/Perpetrators, Alzheimer's, Caregivers, Step Families, Chronic Illness, Interracial Families/Couples
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Dr. Ruth Ann Wright
(775) 964-4157
327 Thoma St.
Reno, NV
Specialties
Child or Adolescent, Relationship Issues, Divorce, Bipolar Disorder
Qualification
School: Fielding Gaduate University
Year of Graduation: 2009
Years In Practice: 20+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Children (6 to 10),Preteens / Tweens (11 to 13),Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults
Average Cost
$90 - $130
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: Cigna

Cornelius Sheehan
(775) 287-7733
ACCS421 Hill Street
Reno, NV
Specialties
Marriage Therapy & Couples Counseli, Depression, Relationship Issues, Impulse Control Disorders
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults,Elders (65+)
Average Cost
$70 - $120
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: CDS Health Group

Mary Howden
(775) 772-2049
Reno, NV
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Childhood & Adolescence, Eating Disorders, Couples & Family, Sports Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Cornelius Sheehan Jr
(775) 356-0371
ACCS421 Hill Street
Reno, NV
Specialties
Relationship Issues, Marriage Therapy & Couples Counseli, Depression, Impulse Control Disorders
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: Male
Age: Adolescents,Adults,Elders
Average Cost
$70 - $100
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: CDS Health Group

Dr. Jerry Clark
Behavioral Services Limited
(775) 772-0392
P. O. Box 14223 200 South Virginia Street, 8th Floor
Reno, NV
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW, Ph.D.
Licensed in Nevada
38 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Depression, Dissociative Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Interpersonal Relationships, Phobias, Psychoses/Major Mental Illness, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Dual Diagnosis, Life Transitions, Personalit
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Jacalyn Gallagher
(775) 772-3263
Reno, NV
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Couples & Family, School, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified School Counselor, National Certified Counselor

Richard Cook, M.Ed., LMFT
(775) 827-7502
177 Cadillac Place
Reno, NV
Specialties
Anxiety or Fears,Child or Adolescent Issues,Depression,Divorce,Loss or Grief,Parenting,Relationship Issues,Spirituality,Thinking Disorders
Gender
Male
Education
I received my Masters in Education (Counseling and Guidance) from Seattle University. I have worked as a teacher, in a psych hospital, in a community health clinic, and, for the past 15 years, in private practice.
Insurance
Yes

Allan Ritchie
(775) 787-0658
Reno, NV
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, School, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified School Counselor, National Certified Counselor

Cynthia Edwards
(775) 971-6425
Reno, NV
Practice Areas
Career Development, Childhood & Adolescence, Counselor Education, Couples & Family, School
Certifications
National Certified School Counselor, National Certified Counselor

Data Provided by:

10 Ways to Reduce Single-Parent Stress

One of every four American children today lives in a single-parent home. And though the circumstances may vary (some parents are divorced, others are widowed, and others are single parents by choice), the reality is that solo parenting is often stressful, demanding, and hectic. If you are a single mom or dad, there are 10 things you can do to help minimize the stress in your life -- and bring back the joy of parenting.


1. Get a handle on finances. Raising a family on one income, or relying on an ex-spouse for child support, can be one of the hardest aspects of parenting alone. That's why it's important to take steps to budget your money, learn about long-term investments, plan for college and retirement, and, if possible, enhance your earning power by going back to school or getting additional job training.

2. Set up a support system. All single parents need help -- whether it's someone to watch the kids while you run out to do errands or simply someone to talk to when you feel overwhelmed. While it's tempting to try to handle everything alone, ask friends and family members for help. You could join a single-parent support group, or, if finances allow, hire a trusted sitter to help out with the kids or someone to assist with housework.

3. Maintain a daily routine. Try to schedule meals, chores, bedtimes, and other family functions at regular hours so that your child knows exactly what to expect each day. A consistent routine will help your child feel more secure and help you feel more organized.

4. Be consistent with discipline. Children thrive when they know which behaviors are expected of them and which rules they need to follow. If you are divorced or separated, work with your spouse to create and observe consistent rules and methods of discipline (there's nothing more stressful than having one parent undermine the other). If your child has other caregivers, talk to them about how you expect your child to be disciplined.

5. Answer questions honestly. Inevitably, questions will come up about the changes in your family, or about the absence of one parent. Answer your child's questions in an open, honest, and age-appropriate way. Make sure that your child gets the help and support he needs to deal with difficult emotions. ###

6. Treat kids like kids. With the absence of a partner, it's sometimes tempting to rely too heavily on children for comfort, companionship, or sympathy. But children have neither the emotional capacity nor the life experience to act as substitute adult partners. If you find yourself depending on your kids too much, or expressing your frustrations to them too often, seek out adult friends and family members to talk to. Or seek counseling if necessary.

7. Abolish the word "guilt" from your vocabulary. It's always easy for single parents to feel guilty about the time they don't have or the things they can't do or provide for their children. But for your own sense of well-being, it's better to focus on all the things you do accomplish on a daily basis and on all the things you do provide -- and don't forget about all the love, attention, and comfort you're responsible for! (If you ever question your day-to-day achievements, just make a list.) If you're feeling guilty about a divorce or other disruption in your home life, think about joining a support group for other divorced parents. Focus on helping your child (and yourself) get the help you need.

8. Take time for your children. Even though the piles of laundry and dirty dishes may beckon, set aside time each day to enjoy your kids. (After all, isn't that what parenting is all about?) Spend quiet time playing, reading, going for a walk, or simply listening to music together. And most important, focus on the love between you and on your relationship as a family.

9. Take time for yourself. Likewise, it's important to schedule time for yourself. Even if it's something as simple as reading a book, taking a warm bath, or having a chat with a friend, setting aside a little personal time will give you a chance to refuel.

10. Stay positive. It's easy to become overwhelmed by all the responsibilities and demands of single parenthood. On top of that, you may be experiencing the pain of divorce or the death of a spouse. Despite all of your own feelings, though, it's important to maintain a positive attitude, since your children are affected by your moods. The best way to deal with stress is to exercise regularly, maintain a proper diet, get enough rest, and seek balance in your life. If you're feeling sad, it's okay to share some of your sentiments with your children, but let them know that they are not the cause of the problems -- and that good times lie ahead for all of you.

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